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Competing on Sustainable Supply Chains

Competing on Sustainable Supply Chains

Increasingly, organizations must measure, monitor, manage and report on their Scope 3 GHG emissions. Decarbonizing value chains while balancing profit...

Increasingly, organizations must measure, monitor, manage and report on their Scope 3 GHG emissions. Decarbonizing value chains while balancing profit targets with increasing costs and decreasing resources is one tough mission for the private sector. It is a tougher mission for Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) that lack the resources of capital, time and trusted sources from which to make sense of the complex and confusing requirements to measure and report Scope 3 emissions. Providing SMEs access to affordable capital to implement Scope 3 reporting is not only key in addressing the market demands for action on climate but also in maintaining globally competitive supply chains.

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The revitalization of manufacturing in Canada

The revitalization of manufacturing in Canada

The federal government has a critical role in addressing key competitiveness issues that have a real impact on Canada’s manufacturing...

The federal government has a critical role in addressing key competitiveness issues that have a real impact on Canada’s manufacturing sector. This includes retaining skilled workers, introducing competitive incentives to invest in technology and helping Canadian-based manufacturers become more competitive and lower their business costs.

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Maintaining Operations in Canada’s Strategic Infrastructures and the Resilience of our International Supply Chains

Maintaining Operations in Canada’s Strategic Infrastructures and the Resilience of our International Supply Chains

Canada’s strategic infrastructure is vital to our supply chain and act as gateways to bring products to market: it is...

Canada’s strategic infrastructure is vital to our supply chain and act as gateways to bring products to market: it is therefore key to the Canadian economy and to the competitiveness of Canadian businesses. This infrastructure is essential to support international partnerships by ensuring the arrival and movement of goods destined for global trade, whose export value alone represents more than 768.2 billion Canadian dollars (Statistics Canada, International Merchandise Trade in Canada, May 2024).

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Increasing Capacity Across Canadian Manufacturing

Increasing Capacity Across Canadian Manufacturing

Strategic and effective government support is required to increase investment and innovation across the Canadian manufacturing sector.

Strategic and effective government support is required to increase investment and innovation across the Canadian manufacturing sector.

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A Balanced Approach to Regulation for Economic Prosperity

A Balanced Approach to Regulation for Economic Prosperity

In 2006, the World Bank’s “Ease of Doing Business” report ranked Canada an impressive 4th in the world. In just...

In 2006, the World Bank’s “Ease of Doing Business” report ranked Canada an impressive 4th in the world. In just 14 years, our country had fallen to 23rd, largely attributed to a challenging regulatory environment. Since the COVID-19 pandemic, reports proliferate showing lagging national productivity. Canada has become a unfriendly place to invest in infrastructure due to lengthy and unpredictable regulatory processes. It is crucial for the prosperity of Canadians that Canada’s regulatory frameworks are reformed to strike a more effective balance between strict regulation and economic competitiveness.

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Interprovincial trade barriers need to fall more quickly to realize $200 billion in GDP growth for Canada this decade

Interprovincial trade barriers need to fall more quickly to realize $200 billion in GDP growth for Canada this decade

Canada is in a productivity crisis. Interprovincial trade in Canada continues to be hampered by a number of policies restricting...

Canada is in a productivity crisis. Interprovincial trade in Canada continues to be hampered by a number of policies restricting competition for a few well-connected sectors of our provincial economies. A rise in each province’s and territory’s GDP would increase overall GDP, improve efficiencies, labour practices, productivity, and make us less reliant on international trade and our lagging innovation economy. In 2024, Statistics Canada computed that these barriers add between 7.8% and 14.5% to goods and services in Canada.{1}

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