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Over the course of the summer, we sat down with business and Indigenous leaders across Canada to hear what they had to say regarding reconciliation, what it means to them, their communities and their businesses.

Despite repeated requests of the federal government to be part of the reconciliation discussion, the business community has been by-and-large excluded. This unfortunate reality is why we seek to demonstrate to the federal government that businesses and Indigenous peoples are often way ahead of them in reconciliation.

“Indigenous peoples contribute billions of dollars to our economy annually and they are creating new businesses at five times the rate of non-Indigenous peoples. When combined with the fact that Indigenous peoples are the youngest, fastest growing demographic in Canada, it is imperative that they have the same opportunities to participate in our economy as others. It is the only way we will be able to compete globally,” said Susanna Cluff-Clyburne, Senior Director, Parliamentary Affairs and Indigenous Policy Lead.

Over the course of the summer, we sat down with business and Indigenous leaders across Canada to hear what they had to say regarding reconciliation, what it means to them, their communities and their businesses.

Click here to read the first report in our series, Lessons in Reconciliation: What We Heard in Saskatoon.

Click here to read the second report in our series, Lessons in Reconciliation: What We Heard in Thunder Bay.

Click here to read the final report in our series, Lessons in Reconciliation: What We Heard in Fredericton.

To see examples of how Canadian businesses are playing their part in reconciliation watch Nuclear Waste Management Organization's videos on reconciliation and guiding conversations or Nutrien's video on their Saskatoon Tribal Council Partnership.

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